BRIGHT & QUIRKY PRESENTS

Solutions for Smart but Struggling Students

A 5-WEEK MASTERS SERIES TO OVERCOME OBSTACLES AND UNWRAP YOUR CHILD’S GIFTS

Bonus Q&A Replay with Dr. Dan Peters, Debbie Reber, Dr. Susan Baum & Debbie

Recorded: Thursday September 26, 2019 at 10am PT

Parents joined our world-renowned experts to ask questions about their 2e kids. Dr. Susan is the director of the 2e Center at Bridges Academy.  Dr. Dan is the executive director and clinical psychologist at the Summit Center. Debbie Reber is the author of Differently Wired. This is an example of Q&A's we do regularly in the Bright & Quirky IdeaLab.

1Debbie introduces panel.
2My son is 10 and refusing to do math. How do you tell what's causing math issues? What do we do when the teacher isn't following the plan?
3My child is slow in doing worksheets, has slow output, perfectionistic, and they are going slower than others. How do I work with the teacher?
4My 9 year old son is at a private general ed school, has challenges and highly gifted. Does the school understand how to teach highly gifted or twice exceptional kids? If he is too overwhelmed, how do we save him before he is in trouble?
5Just started Dr. Dan’s book, “From Worrier to Warrior.” How do we go about the worry journey? We have noticed anxiety is worse annually during October through December. Why?
6My daughter has learning challenges but passes tests. Has sequencing and language tense issues. Plus has letter writing challenges. How do I know if focus issues or language issues are the cause.?
7Debbie Reber's story with neuropsych evaluations, what she did with her son, and what tests were done.
83rd grader in 3rd school, still struggling, was tested at 6, do I need to get him retested? He was having work refusal, and not engaging in work. How do we know if he’s in the right place?
92 of my kids are middle schoolers at a new school for academically advanced kids. They have more homework, and they have executive function challenges. What is the line between adequate scaffolding and over handling the executive function difference, while still encouraging growth?
1012 year old profoundly gifted and suffering with poor self esteem, has been moved around, having trouble fitting in. How do I go about finding the right school and best educational setting?
11My 5 year old boy just started grade 1. Before classes started we spoke to the principal and explained that he is already reading, writing and doing math at a late grade 2 level or maybe even grade 3. He said they would do a deep dive program. So far nothing has really been enhanced for him, he is royally bored in class but won't ask to do work at his level out of anxiety of seeming different and therefore not having friends. I get the meltdowns before and after school. Should I keep trying with the teacher or should I chat with the principal again?
12How do you go through door of their strengths to get through the challenging areas?
13My son is 9 yr old with high functioning ASD and ADHD. He does angular vision. We did vision therapy for years and it gets worse with more complex processing of any information.He's socially awkward sometimes. I'm not sure if I should be working on more vision therapy or just accept it as part of his processing challenges? He looks from the corners of his eyes. corners.
14When our bright and quirky kiddo was first diagnosed, a provider told us meltdowns were just part of the ASD package. I often find myself wondering if this is as good as it gets, or if I should be out there searching for that therapy/medication/system that will help my kid to struggle just a little less. How can we recognize where our kiddos challenges reflect hardwired traits and where there may be room for growth?
15How do we handle tough topics with our 2E kids? Our school recently implemented ALICE training for school shootings. Most parents I talk to, their kids don’t seem phased or they don’t express it. My deep thinking kids have terrible anxiety from it.
16As parents, we know our kids best, but I don’t know about the classroom setting. I think he is going to get bored, I think he expects to be bored. When things seem fine, but the parent internally doesn’t think things are fine. What to do?
1715 year old sophomore and is gifted, has a 504 plan for ADHD. He resists homework and is now anxious and sad. He questions why can’t I do this, and why do I have to do it. How do I help him reframe having to do hw.
18When is medication really necessary? Why is medication prescribed to little kids and does it really work? How can a parent make a safe choice about medication (apart from not giving it at all) for a small kid with a developing brain?
19My request is for ideas for lunch recess accommodations in a middle school. He’s is in a public school program for kids with anxiety. The kids HAVE to go out at lunch. My son hides this anxiety and is starting to refuse school again.
20What’s the best way to advocate for a child with group work at school? He becomes so dysregulated and angry.
21Would a timeout damage the connection so much that it would have real life consequences?
22My 13 year old daughter has been anxious for a long time and is now showing some obsessive-compulsive behaviors. I wondered what advice you had on things to avoid saying to her which may make things worse.
23My middle schooler will raise her hand eagerly, but doesn’t always give relevant answers. This sometimes happens with friends, too. I have no idea how to coach her because she doesn’t see why her answers and comments are off.
24I have an almost 15 year old and 1st year of High School. Gifted/ASD In 6th grade he realized how different he was and so assumed it must be gender and that he must be no-gender. Recently asked the teacher not to use their name. We have never heard this at home and are worried this is a feeling of not feeling value, or some sense of self-worth and have no idea how to approach it. What do you suggest?
25Wrap up

 

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